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What is the difference between radioactive decay and radiometric dating

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­Nuclear radiation can be both extremely beneficial and extremely dangerous. X-ray machines, some types of sterilization equipment and nuclear power plants all use nuclear radiation -- but so do nuclear weapons.

Nuclear materials (that is, s­ubstances that emit nuclear radiation) are fairly common and have found their way into our normal vocabularies in many different ways. In this article, we will look at nuclear radiation so that you can understand exactly what it is and how it affects your life on a daily basis.

Atoms containing this unstable combination regain stability by shedding radioactive energy, hence the term radioisotope.

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On average, one in every two Australians can expect at some stage in his or her life to undergo a nuclear medicine procedure that uses a radioisotope for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.At Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, nuclear power plants released radioactive substances into the atmosphere during nuclear accidents.And in the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan, a nuclear crisis raised fears about radiation and questions about the safety of nuclear power.Despite seeming like a relatively stable place, the Earth's surface has changed dramatically over the past 4.6 billion years.Mountains have been built and eroded, continents and oceans have moved great distances, and the Earth has fluctuated from being extremely cold and almost completely covered with ice to being very warm and ice-free.The nucleus (upper right) is in reality spherically symmetric, although for more complicated nuclei this is not always the case.